How to cut drainage pipe reciprocating saw

When you need to cut a piece of metal pipe, there’s no better tool than a reciprocating saw. With the right blade, you can easily make clean, straight cuts through even the toughest materials. In this blog post, we’ll show you how to use a reciprocating saw to cut drainage pipes. We’ll also recommend some blades that will work well for this task. Let’s get started!

What is a drainage pipe?

A drainage pipe is a tube used to move liquid such as rainwater away from the home. They consist of perforated or solid metal pipes and can be found in many homes, both new and old.

How to cut drainage pipe reciprocating saw step by step:

Here are some steps about how to cut a drainage pipe with a reciprocating saw:

Step 1.

Secure the pipe in place. The easiest way to make a cut is to clamp the section of pipe you want to cut onto a flat work surface, such as a sawhorse or table saw built for this purpose.

Step 2.

Determine the depth of your cut. It’s important that you know how far into the pipe you need to cut. If you don’t, the pipe may collapse when you start cutting, resulting in damage to your home or injury.

Step 3.

Check your blades for fit. You want a blade that’s at least 6 inches long so there’s sufficient metal inside the pipe to provide support while you’re making the cut. Also, check how deep of a cut each blade can make; some are only able to go 1 inch into the metal per stroke, which isn’t enough!

Step 4.

Make sure it is fully charged and ready before using it on any application that might be dangerous or difficult, especially when dealing with electricity like this. Use extra precautions when working with electricity. Ensure reciprocating saw has a guard in place over the front handle (no one likes getting smacked in the face with a reciprocating saw!) and plug into a GFCI outlet if possible.

Step 5.

Begin cutting by holding the saw at a 90-degree angle to the pipe, then slowly move the blade into the pipe until you see sparks coming from within it. Continue cutting until you reach your desired depth.

Step 6.

In order to finish up your cut, slowly lower the saw as far as it can go inside of the pipe without touching the bottom, then pull back on the trigger so that it cuts through completely. Repeat this process until you’ve completed all of your cuts or have reached your final depth for any particular piece of pipe.

Step 7.

Be sure not to overextend yourself physically while cutting a drainage pipe with a reciprocating saw; this type of work requires a lot of movement, and you should only do it if your physical condition is up to snuff.

Step 8.

When finished, remove the pipes from their clamps and place them into place before sealing them in using bar or putty.

Step 9.

Turn off the saw and unplug once done operating the tool to avoid accidents while not in use.

Safety Tips:

1. Inspect your blades before you use the saw to cut the drainage pipe. If there is any damage at all, throw it away and get a new one. Damaged blades could fly off the tool while in use, potentially injuring someone or damaging property.

2 . Ensure the reciprocating saw has a guard in place over the front handle (no one likes getting smacked in the face with a reciprocating saw!) and plug into a GFCI outlet if possible.

3 . Use extra precautions when working with electricity. Ensure reciprocating saw has a guard in place over the front handle (no one likes getting smacked in the face with a reciprocating saw!) and plug into a GFCI outlet if possible.

4 . Wear safety glasses and gloves while operating the saw to avoid injury from the blade catching an object and throwing it, as well as damage from heat generated by friction.

5 . Don’t wear loose clothing or jewelry that could be caught in the teeth of the blade, as they can cause serious injuries such as loss of limbs or fingers.

6 . Don’t use blades that are too long, as they can cause injury if they hit the user or someone else who happens to be near the work area.

7 . Never use a reciprocating saw for anything other than cutting metal, as using it incorrectly can result in injury or damage to property.

FAQs:

How do you avoid splintering the pipe when cutting it?

When properly using a reciprocating saw to cut the pipe, hook it underneath as you would with a hacksaw and make sure you can see where the blade is going. If you can’t, either rotate the pipe or lower it a little bit and make another pass.

Is there a specific blade you should use for this type of cut?

If you’re cutting through steel, the best blade to use is a metal/metal reciprocating saw blade. However, plastic blades are also good for this type of work if they are capable of cutting through metal. You can also try using reciprocating blades with an arbor adapter since they extend the life of blades and cut multiple materials well.

What are the dangers of cutting drainage pipes with a reciprocating saw?

There are a number of dangers associated with using a reciprocating saw to cut drainage pipes. One of the most common injuries is when someone’s fingers get caught in the blade and they pull back on it, causing it to fly off and cause damage or injury.

If you’re cutting through steel, you’re at risk for breathing in metal particles that are expelled by the saw, which can cause lung problems.

Finally, if you’re using the wrong kind of blade or are forcing the tool into cutting metal that it’s not equipped to handle, you could end up damaging the blade and need to replace it sooner than expected.

Conclusion:

In this blog post, we showed you how to cut drainage pipes with a reciprocating saw. We hope you found this information helpful.

If you have any questions or need additional assistance, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We would be happy to help!