How To Make Mortise And Tenon Joints With A Table Saw?

Mortise and tenon joints are one of the strongest ways to join two pieces of wood. They are commonly used in furniture making, carpentry, and woodworking. In this blog post, we will show you how to make mortise and tenon joints with a table saw. We will also share some tips on how to make these joints more efficient. 

How do you make a mortise with a table saw?

  • Set the blade height

Start by setting the blade height to the desired depth of your mortise.

  • Mark the width of the mortise

Next, mark the width of your mortise on the workpiece. This is typically the same width as your tenon.

Using a push block to help guide the workpiece, cut the mortise using a slow and steady motion.

  • Check for fit

Once the mortise is cut, place the tenon in the mortise to check if it fits. If it doesn’t, make any necessary adjustments before cutting the second mortise on your workpiece.

How do you make a tenon with a table saw?

  1. Mark the width of the tenon on one side of the workpiece, typically 1/8″ less than its thickness so that your tenon fits snuggly.
  1. Use a mitre gauge or fence to mark the opposite side at the desired length of your mortise.
  1. Set your blade height so that it’s just below this surface. Cut along one side until you reach the endpoint then turn around and cut back towards yourself stopping just short of where you began cutting initially.
  1. Repeat this process for as many mortise holes as required.
  1. Spend some time creating your tenon on the other side of the workpiece, making it slightly oversize but leaving enough material to be sanded flush afterward.
  1. Then cut both sides of each mortise with a chisel before attempting to fit your tenon in each hole for an accurate fit. Otherwise, if you try to fit your tenon without first removing material with a chisel, it won’t fit since table saws produce clean and smooth walls that don’t leave behind any scallops like those left by hand tools such as chisels.
  1. Once your tenons fit snugly into their respective mortises, check the overall length then trim down the two ends using a mitre gauge or handsaw so that they’re even. This way, you can be sure that your pieces are square when glued together.

Mortise and tenon joints are commonly used in a variety of woodworking projects, including cabinetry and furniture making. They provide a strong joint that resists separation through a wedging effect that tightens as pressure is applied from either side.

Mortise and tenons can be glued together but they’re often connected with a non-adhesive method such as dowels or biscuits since this reduces overall costs while still providing adequate strength due to horizontal shear planes within the tenon that resist separation.

However, there are advantages to using an adhesive since it often provides greater resistance to horizontal shear and vertical shear loads.

To create a mortise for your tenon with a table saw, first mark the width of the tenon on one side of the workpiece, typically 1/8″ less than its thickness so that your tenon fits snuggly. Then, use a miter gauge or fence to mark the opposite side at the desired length of your mortise. Set your blade height so that it’s just below this surface.

Cut along one side until you reach the endpoint then turn around and cut back towards yourself stopping just short of where you began cutting initially. Repeat this process for as many mortise holes as is required.

Spend some time creating your tenon on the other side of the workpiece, making it slightly oversize but leaving enough material to be sanded flush afterward. Then cut both sides of each mortise with a chisel before attempting to fit your tenon in each hole for an accurate fit. Otherwise, if you try to fit your tenon without first removing material with a chisel, it won’t fit since table saws produce clean and smooth walls that don’t leave behind any scallops like those left by hand tools such as chisels.

Once your tenons fit snugly into their respective mortises, check the overall length then trim down the two ends using a miter gauge or handsaw so that they’re even. This way, you can be sure that your pieces are square when glued together.

Start by making repeated plunge cuts with the tip of your blade resting against the far fence. Decrease the depth of each successive pass until you reach the desired depth then turn around and complete this process in reverse to remove any material remaining between holes. 

Mark out where to make each cut on your workpiece before making any actual plunges to prevent tear-out from forming on the opposite side of your stock. If tearout does form due to a dull saw blade, use a chisel to clean up these areas after cutting mortises since table saws don’t leave behind scallops like those produced by hand tools.

What are some tips for making perfect mortise and tenon joints every time?

  • Cut both the mortise and the tenon to a very tight fit. Many people make the mistake of setting these pieces so that there is little play between them. The only thing worse than having gaps in your joints is having crooked gaps. If you can slip one piece into another without any effort, then as your glue dries they will tend to warp and twist resulting in misaligned gaps at best or split faces on either side of your joint at worst. You want these joints to almost be too tight upon assembly! This may mean cutting just slightly oversize with an extra belt sander pass on each part, but it makes for a much less frustrating build when everything goes together nicely.
  • Keep your tools sharp! Dull chisels and saw blades make for less-than-perfect cuts. A lack of cutting fluid or a dull blade will cause the wood fibres to be crushed, not cleanly cut. The end grain in particular takes much more abuse from a dull tool than a sharp one, so if you’re having trouble getting your tenons to fit into your mortises it may very well be because your tools are too dull. [In fact] Tenons should glide into their mortise with little or no effort at all.
  • Don’t overwork the joint. As soon as the pieces start fitting together nicely STOP AND DON’T GO ANY FURTHER! In addition to warping out of alignment during glue-up a slight amount, pushing a bit too far can also break off a tenon or a shoulder while the glue is still wet. This leaves you with an unsightly gap in your nicely-made mortise and tenon joints. The glue needs time to cure, so leave it overnight before moving on to the next step.
  • Take care of your tools. Keep them sharp. The more precisely you cut, the nicer your results will be. If I have been working for an hour or two cutting pieces apart with my crosscut saw without using a file to touch up the teeth I’ll stop and spend a minute filing down any nicks before going back to work – this causes less frustration down the road when trying to fit a joint.

Also, keep your tools clean and dry. And if you want to try cutting tenons on the table saw even easier than using a dado blade set up, invest in an aftermarket thin kerf rip blade with no more than 60 teeth for best results.

Conclusion:

The most important thing is to make sure that your joints are tight and solid. You want the pieces to fit together nicely without any gaps, but you also want them cut with precision so they don’t warp out of alignment during glue-up or break off when dry. When it comes down to the details like this, there’s no better way than Table Saw Tenoning Jig for getting perfect mortise and tenon joints every time!

This innovative tool makes creating these parts a cinch; just set up your workpiece on the jig platform then adjust your table saw blade height until it cuts through both sides at once. The result? A perfectly accurate joint every single time – even if you’re not an expert woodworker yet! With our jig and a little practice, creating beautiful mortises and tenons is so easy even beginners can do it.