What Causes On Kickback Table Saw? – Complete Guide

Kickback usually happens when moving the stock through a blade rotating at a high speed. Most of the time when people talk about kickback, they are actually referring to the kickback from a table saw. In this Article we will explore a complete guide on What causes on kickback table saw? Whenever kickback happens the wood you’re pushing with the blade gets launched back at you at a high rate.

Kickback happens when a piece of wood hits the fence while cutting. When kickback occurs, the blade stops moving forward and retracts back into the machine. This causes the saw blade to move back toward the operator. This is usually due to poor technique.

Kickback can cause some serious injuries. From severe bruising to literally having a shard of wood penetrate your body, kickback can cause a lot of pain. Even worse, you could lose the placement of your hands on the stock and end up putting your hands right in the saw-zones. Yes, it is not a pretty sight at all!

What Causes On Kickback Table Saw?

It sometimes happens during a rip cut, when you get halfway through the cut and the kerf begins to close on the back of the blade, this happens often in construction lumber.

It also happens in the case of the hardened woods. If you have an underpowered saw best case scenario is it’s going to stall it but it could also shoot the workpiece back at you or flip it up and whack you in the face.

Another way that kickback can occur is as you are cutting a workpiece it pinches between the back of the blade and the fence and as it does it can throw the workpiece back towards you with such force that it could even embed itself in a wall behind you.

Types Of Kickback:

Blade Kickback:

When the blade kicks back, the material being cut moves away from the operator. Blade kickback usually happens when there is no guard attached to the saw.

Material Kickback:

When the material being cut kicks back, the material moves toward the operator. Material kickback usually happens when the blade is too close to the material being cut.

What Causes Kickback On A Table Saw?

  • Improperly set up the table saw: If you don’t follow the instructions in the manual, you could cause kickback.
  • Using the wrong blade size: Using a smaller or larger blade than the recommended blade can lead to kickback.
  • Not keeping the blade sharp: A dull blade will bounce off the material instead of slicing through it.
  • Improperly adjust the blade height: Adjusting the blade height too low can also cause kickback.
  • Improperly setting the depth stop: Setting the depth stop too high can cause kickback. The depth stop prevents the blade from going into the material.
  • Using the wrong type of blade: Some blades are designed specifically for certain types of materials. If you are not using the recommended blade which is designed specifically for your material than it can also cause kickback.
  • Using the wrong blade guard: Blade guards prevent kickback by preventing the blade from hitting anything. If you are not using a blade guard at all or using the one which might not be fit for the blade you’re using then it may cause kickback.
  • Improperly guiding a rip fence: Rip fences guide the material as it’s being cut. They can cause kickback if not used properly.
  • Cutting too fast: When you cut too quickly, the blade might hit something hard and bounce back toward you.
  • Improperly positioning the material: Guiding the material improperly can cause kickback. This happens when the material isn’t guided correctly.
  • Improperly guiding a miter gauge: Miter gauges guide the material as it is being cut. If they aren’t used properly, they can cause kickback. Make sure to use a straightedge or other tool to ensure proper guidance.

FAQ,s

How Common Are Table Saw Accidents?

In the United States, 30,000 injuries per year come from table saws. Most of the time, these fatal injuries happen because of a kickback. The injury causes people to lose fingers and hands.

How To Prevent Kickback On Table Saw?

To prevent kickback, make sure the blade is far enough away from the material being cut. Also, use a safety guard to protect yourself from the blade.
Use the correct size material: Use the proper size wood for the job. For example, if you’re making a small picture frame, use 1×4 lumber. If you’re making a large cabinet door, use 2×8 lumber.
Make sure you’ve set up the machine correctly: Make sure the fence is properly adjusted. Adjust the height of the fence so that the top edge of the board is about 3 inches above the surface of the table.
Cut slowly: When you cut quickly, the blade moves faster and is less stable and therefore you should cut slowly. Also, hold the board firmly against the table and don’t let the board fall off the table.
Check the blade frequently: Check the blade frequently to make sure it is not dull.
Use a push stick or push block: The push stick or push block stabilizes the wood as you cut and helps in preventing the kickback from the table saw. Using both a push stick and a push block together makes it easier to control and stabilize the wood as you cut it.

How Do You Stop A Table Saw Kickback?

To stop the table saw kickback you need to follow the steps below:
Stop the saw immediately.
Pull out the blade.
Raise the fence.
Move the material being cut away from the blade.
Check the blade.
Replace the blade with a new one if it is dull.
Use a different type of saw.

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